Attack Of The Crab Monsters (1957)


Attack of the crab monstersATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS (1957) The great producer/director, Roger Corman, was never famous for his originality. It’s why this cheesy low-budget drive-in quickie (Corman’s stock-in-trade) about a giant killer crab opens with one of monster moviedom’s most enduring cliches… hydrogen bombs – a catch-all plot device that explains how anything can get monstrously big (except human intelligence, of course). Corman uses lots of low rent miniatures for his storms, landslides and earthquakes, as a bunch of research scientists try to figure out what’s happening on a deserted island. As usual, there’s a swimsuited scientist babe among them, as well as Russell Johnson, a.k.a. The Professor from Gilligan’s Island, once a promising character actor (and yes… he is seen trying to fix the island’s only radio). In the end, the scientists must have been movie buffs, too, as their plan to kill the killer crab is lifted straight out of The Thing From Another World. Try not to think too much about how the mutated crab, even when it’s nowhere around, is able to taunt everybody by projecting the disembodied voices of dead co-workers. Dialog Alert: “So… you have wounded me. I must grow a new claw. Welllll then, good… for I can do it in a day. But, will you grow new lives when I have taken yours from you?” Find Attack Of The Crab Monsters at Amazon, HERE. New Movies, Fridays ‘Round Midnight.

2 Comments

  • 1
    Darren
    May 4, 2013 - 01:19 | Permalink

    Incredible! This one seemed so much like one of those Cousteau documentaries, I felt like I was there on the island with those people. The acting! The dialogue! The rubber crab claws! The strings used to pull open the crab’s eyes! It was all so life-like… so frighteningly like-like!

    • 2
      Willard
      May 4, 2013 - 14:20 | Permalink

      Some sites say you can also see wheels and legs underneath the crab, but the print here is not good enough to see. You CAN see the dubbed in black “rocks” in some scenes to cover up the lower locomotion.

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