AL KOOPER Al Kooper’s Lost Psychedelic Album

Al Kooper’s Lost Psychedelic Album
A Mind-Altering Collection

Not really “lost,” just a collection of some of Al Kooper’s unsung psychedelic tracks from over the years. The guy had his fingers in so many pies it’s easy to forget that some of his best work was recorded during the psychedelic era. And Al did indulge… often through the songs of others – which is the reason why Al Kooper’s Lost Psychedelic Album features tunes from the likes of Nilsson, Traffic and Donovan (the bonus version of “Season of the Witch” with Steve Stills and without horns). Those that generally avoid Kooper just might enjoy Al’s psychedelic side. Didn’t know Al had one? Listen for all the effects and atmospherics Kooper includes before, after and during the songs. Tracks come from Child Is Father To The Man, Super Session, I Stand Alone, You Never Know Who Your Friends Are, Easy Does It, Kooper Session & others (find many of them in the archives, HERE… and all of our Kooper stuff, HERE). Some are these particular tracks are vinyl rips.

UPDATED!
Miles, over at Birds With Broken Wings, has expanded and “remastered” Al’s Lost Psych LP, giving all the segues cleaner, much-needed pro transitions and adding even more material to create a very cool and much better “Deluxe Edition,” of an album that never existed in the first place. Miles actually calls it ISA: Al Kooper’s Midnight Dream. It’s so good, we canned ours and have opted to provide Miles’ version here.


Overture 1 (0:35)
One (2:50)
Coloured Rain (3:01)
Soft Landing On The Moon (3:57)
Baby Please Don’t Go (13:18)
Right Now For You (2:34)
Over And Underture (So Much Love) (2:29)
Song And Dance For The Unborn, Frightened Child (3:49)
House In The Country (3:06)
Lucille (3:22)
I Can’t Quit Her (3:35)
Magic In My Socks (4:27)
You Never Know Who Your Friends Are (2:52)
Mournin‘ Glory Story (2:12)
Season Of The Witch (2002 Remix w/o Horns) (11:05)
You Don’t Love Me (4:09)
One Room Country Shack (3:33)
Sad, Sad Sunshine (5:11)
Overture II (1:55)

11 Comments

  • 1
    sIR bILLY hIMALAYA
    April 14, 2008 - 07:49 | Permalink

    Bit under-rated our Al. The Tubes called him a jerk (as a producer)but at his best a quality performer. Nice compilation. I actually did a similar one a couple of years ago but dumped it, yours is much better. Cheers, old son.

  • 2
    Joseph "Jon" Lanthier
    April 14, 2008 - 16:17 | Permalink

    Wow…all that's missing is the 12 minute Coltrane-on-acid version of "Baby Please Don't Go" from Easy Does It (or the live 8 minute version from his great Rare and Well Done comp). Oh, and the weird backwards guitar solo from his version of "Come Down in Time". Hey, I guess Al is pretty psychedelic after all!

    btw anyone looking for some very amusing, illuminating brain candy should check out Al's book "Backstage Passes and Backstabbing Bastards". A very good read, the story about Lynyrd Skynyrd's racial epithets re: Jimi Hendrix is worth the price of admission alone.

  • 3
    Anonymous
    April 15, 2008 - 12:23 | Permalink

    nice job. thanks!

  • 4
    JR Heat Warp
    April 15, 2008 - 15:09 | Permalink

    Incredible comp, GREAT sequencing! Nicely done, Willard.

  • 5
    newmradio
    April 16, 2008 - 14:22 | Permalink

    Very nice, my friend!

  • 6
    Miles
    April 19, 2008 - 07:06 | Permalink

    great idea, willard! i can always appreciate some al kooper. i look forward to hearing your mix!
    thanks.

  • 7
    Anonymous
    April 19, 2008 - 08:57 | Permalink

    I think Kooper's vocals are better suited for pop music. This is far more convincing than his soul stuff.

  • 8
    valis
    June 25, 2008 - 12:04 | Permalink

    Nicely done!

  • 9
    W
    April 5, 2011 - 00:30 | Permalink

    .
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    Find it HERE.
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  • 10
    ate2zee
    April 23, 2012 - 22:21 | Permalink

    Thanks for the psychedelic Al Kooper album. Of course there was a psychedelic Al. There’s an Al from every R&R era back in the day. I read his book where he describes how he osmosed his way into playing with Dylan on Like a Rolling Stone, then later contributed the background party sounds on Rainy Day Women #12 & 35. The stories just keep on coming. He started out working in tin pan alley & just kept working his way through R&R history.

    • 11
      Willard
      April 23, 2012 - 22:36 | Permalink

      His history is an amazing read. From “This Diamond Ring” for Gary Lewis & The Playboys to discovering Lynyrd Skynyrd. He’s was everywhere… the Forrest Gump of Rock.

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