THE BEATLES Studio Sessions (Beatles For Sale & Help)

Beatles For Sale Studio Sessions (2011)
Help! Studio Sessions (2011)
Volumes Four & Five

Just surfaced… more gathered Beatles sessions and rarities. Like the first three volumes in this series, Please Please Me Studio Sessions, With The Beatles Studio Sessions and A Hard Day’s Night Studio Sessions (find them all HERE), these two new collections flesh out some of the Beatles’ early recording sessions, offering telling editorial changes with each successive take. Check out the progression of “I’m A Loser” (Takes 1-8), below. The song had already been worked out in detail prior to Takes 1 & 2, but by Take 3, John & Paul have already changed the song’s introduction, adding that great slow vocal beginning we all now know (check out how rich and detailed those voices get with each take). You can hear McCartney wrestling with his essential high background vocals throughout Take 3, but he’s nailed them by the next full version, leaving Lennon to sing the “not what I appear to be” chorus solo, echoing the new intro and etching the arrangement in stone for future takes. In Take 6, Lennon’s Dylan-ripped harmonica wails, but by Take 8 he’s ready to wrap it up and go. John & Paul’s moments together are The Beatles’ most meaningful, and hearing McCartney work out his miracle harmonies within Lennon’s loose blueprint is like witnessing a master class. For those interested in the step-by-step creation of some of rock’s most indelible material, here are the schematics . We’ll post subsequent volumes as they surface.



 

18 Comments

  • 1
    Willard
    October 12, 2011 - 09:35 | Permalink

    Search HERE

  • 2
    Richard
    October 13, 2011 - 17:34 | Permalink

    Brilliant.
    Thanks so much Willard

  • 3
    pete
    October 13, 2011 - 18:34 | Permalink

    Thanks! Remarkable haircuts too

  • 4
    furu.inu
    October 13, 2011 - 19:47 | Permalink

    Can you tell me why these sets sound so much more real and life-like than the official releases? Or, conversely, why even the remasters don’t sound this good? I know it’s the oldest cliche in audio circles, but (for me anyway) listening to the acoustic guitar, bass, and drums on take 4 of “Help!” really is like being in the studio at the moment of creation. Or perhaps I’m just deeply deluded. Regardless, thanks for these brilliant sets.

    • 5
      Willard
      October 13, 2011 - 19:57 | Permalink

      No. I agree. I’ve complained about it before on other posts. The remasters sound like the tracks were taken apart and put back together. This stuff sounds like a band live in the studio.

  • 6
    Colin H
    October 14, 2011 - 11:44 | Permalink

    My favorite bit is right at the top of disc one, when Lennon says “Now, don’t slow down, for christ’s sake, or I’ll give you no more drugs”…

    • 7
      Willard
      October 14, 2011 - 12:58 | Permalink

      There are some funny asides and priceless moments to be found.

  • 8
    October 15, 2011 - 00:38 | Permalink

    Bless you, Willard, for all you do.

  • 9
    wiley prybar
    October 15, 2011 - 11:44 | Permalink

    Thanks for the Fabage, Willard! I cannot hear enough Beatles, especially these amazing studio sessions; they offer so much insight into their creative process and how these timeless classics came to be. And their camaraderie on these earlier sessions is how I like to remember them.

    This is the kind of material I make sure the younger, cynical, Beatles-denier musicians I run into get to hear. Yeah, really, kid, they weren’t such a hot band? Amazing how convincing these raw sessions can be in converting doubters.

    Wonderful stuff. Thank you!

  • 10
    Visions
    October 15, 2011 - 20:14 | Permalink

    Helter Skelter Records, which appears to be responsible for these Back to Basics releases, has also put out a remastered mono version of the Peter Sellers Tape, and something (in two volumes, I think) called Yellow Chatter Custard. The Peter Sellers Tape is less interesting, but I wonder if anyone has found the Yellow Chatter Custard items. They appear to be pretty cool, and apparently contain a lot of original (which is not the same thing as important) material. Captain?

  • 11
    Visions
    October 16, 2011 - 07:08 | Permalink

    Answered my own question. Yellow Chatter Custard is a couple hundred small sound bites of studio chat, plus the occasional longer piece of a song rehearsal. The better bits of “chat” are being integrated into the Studio Sessions releases – which is one reason why they sequence so well and sound so real. But the Yellow Chatter Custard collections are for completists only.

  • 13
    Matt
    February 11, 2012 - 14:06 | Permalink

    Looking forward to these. Thanks for sharing.

  • 14
    snickers
    March 24, 2012 - 15:29 | Permalink

    Of course, these recordings sound GREAT, because they are straight from the sound boards, and no equalization, or mixing typically has taken place.

    Like any audiophile, you just want to hear the performance, not the mixing. Nothing like RAW live performances, the music always more LIVE, when they are taken from the original master tapes.

    ;-) smile, Once upon a time, there AUDIO was an art, analog although still king, just isn’t practical with IPOD’s taking over the nation. And to think we were excited about the WALKMAN….lol…

    CD’s are quite disposable……..LOL One has to ask, why after almost 50 years, we are still intrigued with THE BEATLES…

  • 15
    JMc
    April 16, 2012 - 16:28 | Permalink

    Absolutely Awesome. Thank you

  • 16
    Colby
    July 9, 2013 - 16:57 | Permalink

    Wonderful stuff – Thanks Willard! It looks like the link for the 3rd disc of the Help! Studio Sessions is down.

    • 17
      Willard
      July 9, 2013 - 19:41 | Permalink

      New link up, thanks.

  • 18
    Supersonic75
    August 15, 2013 - 01:29 | Permalink

    Great. Thanks!

  • Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published.

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>