LOSS LEADERS #26: The People’s Record (1976)

The People's Record fullThe People’s Record (1976)
More Acoustics, Less Disco…

The sole oddity to be found on The People’s Record is one whose history I’m not familiar with. According to the liner notes (again by Dr. Demento), a track from Little Feat – a re-recording of their “All That You Dream,” originally found on their 1975 LP, The Last Record Album – and released only as a 45… until appearing here. Why the band wanted a make-over is beyond me, as is whether this version would eventually surface elsewhere or not. The rest of the tracks come from Warners’ catalog of recently released albums, and leans back to the folkier roots of the series, with contributions from James Taylor, Arlo Guthrie, Gordon Lightfoot, Leon Redbone and other like-minded types, though… there’s also a fair share of rockers, jazzers and left-fielders, too, lending this set the diversity we’ve come to expect from the label, in general, and the Loss Leaders series, in particular. Mike Finnigan, who you can hear below, is the keyboard player whose name appears in many an album credits, from Hendrix to David Crosby to Buddy Guy. As usual, there are some interesting names and unions to be discovered in the liner notes. HERE is a print ad for The People’s Record. Vinyl copies are at Amazon, HERE. Find all the Loss Leaders, HERE.

Side 1
James Taylor Shower The People (4:35)
Gordon Lightfoot
I’d Do It Again (3:16)
Dion
Runaway Man (3:03)
The Beach Boys
Back Home (2:51)
Arlo Guthrie
Patriots’ Dream (2:55)
Mike Finnigan
Saved By The Grace Of Your Love (2:43)
Fleetwood Mac
Over My Head (3:37)

Side 2
Peter Ivers In Pursuit Of Treasure (3:14)
Tiger
Suzy Slicker (4:34)
Alice Cooper
Go To Hell (5:12)
Graham Central Station
Save Me (5:27)
Philip Catherine
We’ll Find A Way (5:03)
Nazareth
I Will Not Be Led (3:28)

Side 3
Lamont Dozier Right There (4:00)
Little Feat
All That You Dream (3:36)
George Benson
This Masquerade (8:06)
Al Jarreau
Hold On Me (1:49)
Rod Stewart
The Killing Of Georgie (Parts I and II) (6:30)

Side 4
Billy Joe Shaver Texas Uphere Tennessee (2:43)
Leon Redbone
Polly Wolly Doodle (2:53)
Michael Franks
Popsicle Toes (4:39)
Rex Allen, Jr.
Crying In The Rain (2:56)
Bonnie Bramlett
You Send Me (3:40)
Ray Stevens
Om (4:31)
Tom Ranier
Goin’ Home (4:29)
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LOSS LEADERS #25: Supergroup (1976)

Supergroup fullSupergroup (1976)
From ‘Put On Your Sailin’ Shoes’ To Put On Your Dancin’ Shoes…

There’s nothing included on Supergroup that wasn’t readily available on any of the 23 Warner Bros. albums this collection was designed to promote, but the set is still an interesting sign of the times… as that new-fangled dance craze that was just beginning to sweep the world in 1975 begins worming its way into some of the material heard here. In strange places, too, like Elvin Bishop’s “Struttin’ My Stuff” and The Bellamy Brothers’ “Let Your Love Flow.” It’s not straight-out disco, mind you, but it’s easy to hear the artistic concessions to the changing consumerism in recordings by long establish types looking for inroads back to the airwaves – from George Benson to The Four Seasons to The Doobie Brothers. Fortunately… just as many have chosen to keep the faith; Jesse Colin Young revs up Randy Newman’s “Have You Seen My Baby” (a.k.a. Hold On), Todd Rundgren covers The Yardbirds “Happenings Ten Years Time Ago,” Maria Muldaur records Wendy Waldman’s “Back By Fall” and Emmylou Harris offers her cover of “Ohh Las Vegas” (first heard on Gram’s Grievous Angel). Some new, jazzier names surface here as well, including Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Pat Martino and Miroslav Vitous. Check the inside cover to put names to the faces of the cover art, cleanly printed with no album title (or any other information, save the catalog number). HERE is a July, 1976 advert for Supergroup. Vinyl copies can be found at Amazon, HERE. Find all the Loss Leaders, HERE.

Side 1
Jorge Calderon City Music (3:35)
William D. Smith
Take Your Pick (Do Your Trick) (3:47)
Jesse Colin Young
Have You Seen My Baby (3:27)
The Four Seasons
Silver Star (6:03)
Elvin Bishop
Struttin’ My Stuff (4:05)
Bellamy Brothers
Let Your Love Flow (3:16)

Side 2
George Benson Breezin’ (5:27)
First Choice
Are You Ready For Me (4:00)
Bootsy’s Rubber Band
Physical Love (4:44)
Miroslav Vitous
Synthesizers Dance (5:06)
Todd Rundgren
Happenings Ten Years Time Ago (3:13)

Side 3
The Doobie Brothers Rio (3:47)
Michael Franks
Monkey See – Monkey Do (3:32)
Seals & Crofts
Get Closer (3:53)
Maria Muldaur
Back By Fall (3:59)
John Sebastian
Welcome Back (2:49)
Leon & Mary Russell
Quiet Nights (3:20)

Side 4
Pat Martino Starbright (3:34)
Roger Cook
Beautiful Memories (4:14)
Phil Cody
Bogie (2:41)
Rahsaan Roland Kirk
Sweet Georgia Brown (4:46)
Emmylou Harris
Ooh Las Vegas (3:36)
Slade
All The World Is A Stage (3:58)
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LOSS LEADERS #24: The Works (1975)

The Works full
The Works (1975)
A Fitting Title…

The Works, as the title might suggest, boasts a wide assortment… contributions from Black Sabbath, Rod Stewart, The Meters, Little Feat, Foghat, Jimmy Cliff, Graham Central Station, the welcomed returned of Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart (together), and plenty of individually stylistic types to round things out… from Leon Redbone to David Sandborn to Al Jarreau to perennial WB favorite, Van Dyke Parks. Nothing in this collection was hard to find or unusual back in 1975 (according to the liner notes, anyway), with the exception of The Beach Boys’ very obscure, “Child Of Winter,” a 1974 Christmas single b-side to “Susie Cincinnati.” The track was so rare, it wouldn’t show up on a Beach Boys album until 1998’s Ultimate Christmas collection. It also features 2/3rds of (the still-to-come) Wilson-Phillips – Brian’s daughters Carnie and Wendy Wilson – on sleigh bells. Dr. Demento is back to compile and annotate this collection, and the liner notes even reference the fact that collectors were spending “$25 or more” for the “sadly discontinued” 3LP Loss Leader, Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies (HERE). Also hidden in the text; Commander Cody’s Tales From The Ozone was produced by Hoyt Axton (and it’s available on 8-track and cassette); Richard Pryor collaborated with Mel Brooks on the screenplay to Blazing Saddles; it was deemed necessary to point out that Leon Redbone had no affiliation with the band, Redbone; and in a never-ending attempt to sell Bonnie Raitt to the masses, she had been paired with five different producers over five albums, the latest being famed Doors producer, Paul Rothchild. Future screenwriter Charlie Haas contributes to the notes. BIG thanks once again to Rebecca for ripping and scanning The Works for us all to enjoy. See an ad for The Works from Rolling Stone, HERE. Find all of our Loss Leaders, HERE.

Side 1
Rod Stewart Stone Cold Sober (4:08)
Foghat
Fool For the City (4:29)
Jimmy Cliff
If I Follow My Mind (2:43)
Montrose
Dancin’ Feet (3:59)
Tower Of Power
On The Serious Side (2:48)
Van Dyke Parks
Clang Of The Yankee Reaper (3:36)

Side 2
Fleetwood Mac World Turning (4:22)
Al Jarreau
We Got By (4:59)
Bonnie Raitt
What Do You Want The Boy To Do? (3:16)
Ray Wylie Hubbard & The Cowboy Twinkies
Jazzbo Dancer (3:04)
David Sanborn
It Took A Long Time (3:28)
Graham Central Station
Water (4:23)

Side 3
The Meters Fire On The Bayou (4:03)
Leo Sayer
Moonlighting (4:10)
Little Feat
One Love Stand (4:22)
Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen
Roll Your Own (3:15)
Richard Pryor
Cocaine (4:04)
Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart
Debra Kadabra (3:53)

Side 4
Ronee Blakley American Beauty (1:58)
Leon Redbone
Desert Blues (Big Chief Buffalo Nickel) (3:38)
Chris Ducey
Seeds (4:44)
Black Sabbath
Supertzar (3:40)
Todd Rundgren’s Utopia
Something’s Coming (2:51)
The Beach Boys
Child Of Winter (2:49)
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LOSS LEADERS #23: I Didn’t Know They Still Made Records Like This (1975)

I Didn't Know They Still Made Records Like This full
I Didn’t Know They Still Made Records Like This (1975)
… In A Way, They Don’t!

Something about the 1975 Loss Leader, I Didn’t Know They Still Made Records Like This, seems a little different… yet the same. Starting with the album cover, whose design reeks of some long-ignored graphics designer and photographer teaming up to hatch a surefire scheme to meet hot cover models. Then there’s the curious song selection. It’s always great to hear Van Morrison’s “Moondance,” but the album it came from was released five years prior, in 1970, while Randy Newman’s “Mama Told Me Not To Come” comes from his already ancient ’71 live album. Joni Mitchell’s “Carey” is from her 1971 LP, Blue, and Arlo Guthrie’s cover of “City Of New Orleans” was first issued in 1972. Now… these are all great songs, and considered ‘should-owns’ for any collection, but on the surface it looks like Warners didn’t have any new music to promote. Perhaps they were just pushing the back catalog, or maybe it’s as the cover suggests… they don’t make records like this anymore, and here are some of them again to remind you. The uncredited liner notes offer no reasoning, and are more historical than revelatory. So, I Didn’t Know They Still Made Records Like This ends up being an oddball entry in the ongoing series… one that wasn’t even advertised all that much (if at all) via inner sleeves, either. All the while stylistically seeming like an earlier edition in the series, thanks to the older material. Something I didn’t know (or just refused to remember) is that Leo Sayer’s career was kickstarted when The Who’s Roger Daltry specifically picked him to write songs for his debut solo album. Now you know who to blame. Hard copies of this one are at Amazon, HERE. Find all the Loss Leaders, HERE.

Side 1
Seals & Crofts I’ll Play For You (4:05)
Bonnie Raitt
You Got To Be Ready For Love (If You Wanna Be Mine) (3:10)
Leo Sayer
One Man Band (3:36)
Dionne Warwick
Then Came You (3:58)
Van Morrison
Moondance (4:36)
Fleetwood Mac
Rhiannon (4:10)

Side 2
James Taylor How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You) (3:36)
Marcia Waldorf
The Rhythm Of The South (3:27)
Arlo Guthrie
The City Of New Orleans (4:29)
Randy Newman
Birmingham (2:49)
Cher
Geronimo’s Cadillac (3:04)
Emmylou Harris
If I Could Only Win Your Love (2:37)
Chris Ducey
Hula Rocka Hula (3:24)

Side 3
Joni Mitchell Carey (3:04)
Randy Newman
Mama Told Me Not To Come (1:53)
John Sebastian
Singing The Blues (2:22)
Maria Muldaur
Oh Papa (3:19)
Kenny Rankin
Silver Morning (4:17)
Wendy De Los Rios
Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 In A Major, Opus 92, 2nd Movement (5:08)
San Sebastian Strings
Declaration/Atlas (2:56)

Side 4
Gordon Lightfoot Rainy Day People (2:50)
Gregg Allman
These Days (3:57)
Rex Allen, Jr.
I Can See Clearly Now (3:41)
Wendy Waldman
Spring Is Here (3:28)
Jesse Colin Young
Songbird (4:16)
Rod McKuen
They’re Playing Our Song (2:59)
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LOSS LEADERS #22: Peaches Vol. 2 (1975)

Peaches Vol. 2 backPeaches Vol. 32
Peaches Vol. 2 (1975)
In 1975, Capricorn Records Was Coming On Strong…

One thing I’ve gleaned from the two editions of Peaches, as well as a couple of the other Loss Leaders featuring Capricorn acts, is just how consistently solid Wet Willie was/is. Funky, soulful, southern and passionate… and the legendary Tom Dowd is on board to produce this set’s contribution, “Ain’t He A Mess.” As for the rest of this 2LP collection, a virtual replay of the first Peaches released just a year earlier, there’s not much in the way of rarities, though… a number of tracks are from albums that were then in the works. The broad diversity, however, illustrates that Capricorn had more on their corporate minds than just southern-fried rock. There’s plenty of country and soul here, too, both from veterans and newcomers. New label signee Travis Wammack was best known as a Muscle Shoals session guitarist, while the great Bonnie Bramlett (of Delaney & Bonnie) joins the Georgia label with her soulful 1975 release, It’s Time. Speaking of which, Bonnie’s former bandmate, Bobby Whitlock (ex-Derek & The Dominos), is on board with his Capricorn debut, One Of A Kind. Rounding it all out are names familiar from the first edition, and from southern rock and country genres in general; The Allman Brothers (including solo Gregg & Richard Betts), Grinderswitch, The Marshall Tucker Band, and other like-minded types. Like the first Peaches (HERE), Peaches Vol. 2 was rarely included in the label’s mail order ads alongside the other Loss Leaders, but when it was advertised, like in Rolling Stone (HERE), it was marked-up an additional 50¢, selling for $2.50. Guess the Capricorn boys wanted a piece of lost profits, too. Find all of our Loss Leaders posts, HERE.

Side 1
Elvin Bishop Sure Feels Good (2:48)
Wet Willie
Ain’t He A Mess (2:56)
Bobby Whitlock
Free And Easy (4:33)
Gregg Allman
Are You Lonely For Me Baby (4:28)
John Hammond
It’s Groovin’ Time (2:48)
Travis Wammack
Love Being Your Fool (3:22)

Side 2
The Allman Brothers Band Nevertheless (3:31)
Hydra
The Pistol (4:38)
Fallenrock
Love’s A Game (2:39)
Percy Sledge
I Believe In You (3:08)
Marcia Waldorf
You Don’t Have To Beg For What You’re Man Enough To Steal (2:38)
Grinderswitch
Drifter (4:18)

Side 3
Razzy Bailey Peanut Butter (2:14)
Kitty Wells
Anybody Out There Wanna Be A Daddy (3:19)
Johnny Wright
Wild, Passionate Lover (3:18)
Kenny O’Dell
My Honky Tonk Ways (2:19)
Johnny Darrell
Pieces Of My Life (3:40)

Side 4
The Marshall Tucker Band Fire On The Mountain (3:57)
Martin Mull
Do The Dog (2:53)
Cowboy
Where Can You Go? (2:19)
Bonnie Bramlett
Since I Met You Baby (3:05)
Blue Jug
Hard Luck Jimmy (3:22)
Richard Betts
Highway Call (4:31)
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LOSS LEADERS #21: All Meat (1975)

All Meat fullAll Meat (1975)
Collectors Need To Seek Out The Bologna-Colored Vinyl Version…

The major rarity that surfaced with 1975’s All Meat – the 45RPM-only duet by Harry Nilsson and Cher, “A Love Like Yours (Don’t Come Knocking Every Day)” – was originally recorded during the sessions for John Lennon’s Rock ‘N’ Roll, under the watchful eye of future murderer, Phil Spector. How Phil managed to make the pair sound like each other is anybody’s guess. This is the only album the song has ever appeared on (unless it showed up on some obscure Spector comp somewhere). Also on this edition; Emmylou Harris is sounding like a young Dolly Parton on Rodney Crowell’s “Bluebird Wine,” from her first, post-Gram Parsons solo release; Curtis Mayfield appears on a Loss Leader for the first time, via his own Curtom label, which had just signed a new distribution deal with WB; and any album with music from Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen is worth hearing. The Airmen cover Phil Harris’ 1937 tune, “That’s What I Like About The South,” while Geoff Muldaur continues the rustic songbook raid by covering 1929’s “Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You,” and Peter Yarrow (of …Paul & Mary) revisits 1930’s “Brother, Can You Spare A Dime?” The Band’s Robbie Robertson produces Hirth Martinez’ contribution from Hirth From Earth, while the ongoing exhumation of Jimi Hendrix continued with a cut from Crash Landing, “Captain Coconut.” Two interesting tidbits from the liner notes… 1) The Beau Brummels’ mid-60s hit, “Laugh Laugh,” was produced by a 21 year-old Sly Stone, and 2) Todd Rundgren’s LP, Initiation, contained 63 minutes of music, “the most ever presented on a single, first-edition rock disc.” Interestingly, All Meat also had a very rare promotional edition, though it’s unknown (by us, anyway) how, or to whom, it was distributed. As seen above (on the left), it featured bologna-colored vinyl encased in plastic, to mimic a package of luncheon meat. How cool is that? It’s a highly coveted rarity, so act accordingly if you ever come across one. The more conventional cover, some with a fake (or not) cut-out hole in the upper corner, is seen on the right. Click below to view the plain, text-only back cover. The album’s official title? It’s all over the map, and is alternately referred to as All Meat100% All MeatBurbank’s Finest: 100% All Meat… or, as printed on the labels, All Meat Sampler. See an ad for it, HERE. Amazon has the $2 version, HERE. Grab all of our Loss Leaders posts, HERE.

Side 1
The Doobie Brothers Take Me In Your Arms (3:33)
James Taylor
I Was A Fool To Care (3:17)
Faces
You Can Make Me Dance Sing Or Anything (3:27)
Wendy Waldman
Wings (3:37)
Nilsson/Cher
A Love Like Yours (Don’t Come Knocking Every Day) (3:38)
Curtis Mayfield
So In Love (5:16)

Side 2
Elvin Bishop Juke Joint Jump (5:25)
John Hammond
Can’t Beat The Kid (2:13)
Emmylou Harris
Bluebird Wine (3:10)
Grinderswitch
Let The South Wind Blow (4:09)
Wet Willie
Dixie Rock (5:10)
Commander Cody And His Lost Planet Airmen
That’s What I Like About The South (2:38)

Side 3
Allen Toussaint Country John/Southern Nights (4:45)
Gary Wright
Dream Weaver (4:15)
The Beau Brummels
Singing Cowboy (3:14)
Peter Yarrow
Brother, Can You Spare A Dime (2:55)
Geoff Muldaur
Gee Baby, Ain’t I Good To You (3:46)
John Renton
Monday Morning (2:43)
Martin Mull
Show Me Yours (I’ll Show You Mine) (3:11)

Side 4
Jesse Colin Young Motorhome (2:55)
Hirth Martinez
Comin’ Round The Moon (3:32)
Todd Rundgren
Eastern Intrigue (5:05)
Earth, Wind & Fire
Moment Of Truth (2:57)
Labelle
Won’t Get Fooled Again (4:38)
Jimi Hendrix
Captain Coconut (4:12)
All Meat BackAll Meat InsideAll Meat Inside Text
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LOSS LEADERS #20: The Force (1974)

The ForceThe Force back
The Force (1975)
May It Be With You…

Jan & Dean’s “Laurel & Hardy” is a bizarre, 1968 45 release that’s included here for reasons completely unknown. Bolstered by an electric sitar and a psychedelicized arrangement, the song had never appeared on an LP before showing up on The Force. Dr. Demento (Barry Hansen), who compiled and annotated this collection, calls it “an exquisite rarity,” and one can’t help but think the good Doctor included the oddity here solely for his own amusement. The song wouldn’t surface again until the 2010 ‘lost album’ issue of Jan & Dean’s Carnival Of Sound. The liners also explain how Ron Wood’s I’ve Got My Own Album To Do got its title. Turns out it was a Mick Jagger utterance, exhaled as he lent his talents (along with Keith Richards) to the LP’s sessions, represented here by “I Can Feel The Fire.” Bachman-Turner-Bachman is actually the band Brave Belt, renamed when their second album, Brave Belt II was re-released by WB with the clumsy introductory title, Bachman-Turner-Bachman As Brave Belt. All this name-gaming was taking place to piggyback off the band’s even newer name, Bachman-Turner Overdrive. Phew. That’s Ry Cooder playing mandolin and slide guitar on the contribution from John Sebastian. “Hands,” from country singer Debbie Dawn (penned by Ian Whitcomb), was another 45RPM-only release when first issued on The Force. Mike McGear, Paul McCartney’s brother, shows up with “Norton,” a track produced and co-written by Paulie. Other cool entries include Maria Muldaur’s “It Ain’t The Meat, It’s The Motion,” Kenny Rankin’s “In The Name Of Love” and Gregg Allman’s “Double Cross.” As usual, there’s plenty more. Note the irreverent anti-authoritarian dig hidden on the front cover, “Genuine Pigskin.” The back cover’s Dragnet parody was penned by future screenwriter, Charlie Haas (Over The Edge, Tex, Matinee). See a print ad, HERE. Find all of our Loss Leaders posts, HERE.

Side 1
Leo Sayer Long Tall Glasses (3:04)
Jethro Tull
Bungle In The Jungle (3:31)
Kenny Rankin
In The Name Of Love (3:21)
Fleetwood Mac
Silver Heels (3:22)
Percy Sledge
I’ll Be Your Everything (3:19)
Graham Central Station
Feel The Need (3:54)

Side 2
Trapeze Turn It On (5:06)
Foghat
Rock & Roll Outlaw (3:43)
Montrose
I Got The Fire (3:05)
Todd Rundgren’s Utopia
Freedom Fighters (3:57)
Bachman-Turner-Bachman
Goodbye, Soul Shy (3:39)
Deep Purple
Stormbringer (4:09)

Side 3
The Marshall Tucker Band This Ol’ Cowboy (6:37)
John Sebastian
Wild About My Lovin’ (2:59)
Debbie Dawn
Hands (3:07)
Maria Muldaur
It Ain’t The Meat, It’s The Motion (2:59)
Jan & Dean
Laurel & Hardy (2:42)
Mike McGear
Norton (2:37)

Side 4
The Doobie Brothers Black Water (4:10)
Ron Wood
I Can Feel The Fire (4:44)
Tower Of Power
Only So Much Oil In The Ground (2:58)
Gregg Allman
Double Cross (4:33)
Van Morrison
Comfort You (4:27)
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LOSS LEADERS #19: Deep Ear (1974)

Deep Ear fullDeep Ear (1974)
It’s Best Not To Look Too Closely At The Cover

While there are plenty of new names to be found on Deep Ear, what had become apparent by the mid 70s was just how long Warners Bros. was willing to stand behind and support acts that still weren’t moving many units for the label. Artists like Randy Newman, Van Dyke Parks, Ry Cooder, Bonnie Raitt and others were, more often than not, given time to grow and develop – until they found their audience – a luxury not always afforded great recording artists. After all, guys like Newman don’t become sought-after, Grammy-winning, Disney soundtrackers overnight. The sad truth is that many of this collection’s now established talents would’ve been booted into oblivion as modern upstarts. That the Loss Leaders series continued to celebrate the unique and esoteric (under the guise of selling more vinyl) is one of the reasons these comps are still valid today. One of this set’s more unusual tracks is Van Dyke Parks’ composition, “Come To The Sunshine,” a minor hit for Harpers Bizarre that Warners had to borrow from MGM to even include here. Van Dyke specially edited the 1966 45 for inclusion, so it’s probably not available anywhere else in this form. That’s obviously for fans and collectors, and was hardly designed to sell records back in 1974. By the way, Van Dyke produces Little Feat’s essential “Spanish Moon,” too. The Maria Muldaur track comes from the 1972 movie, “Steelyard Blues.” Allen Toussaint writes and/or produces four tracks on Deep Ear, and pre-Sir George Martin produces America. Dr. Demento, who returns to compile, annotate and, in his own weird way, perform on Deep Ear, can be heard on the opening track introducing the album to follow. BIG thanks once again to Rebecca for ripping this rarity and scanning the artwork for all of us, for which we’re very appreciative. HERE is one of 5 different print ads that made its into Rolling Stone magazine. Vinyl copies are at Amazon, HERE. Find all of our Loss Leaders posts, HERE.

Side 1
Good Rats Back To My Music (2:45)
James Taylor
Rock ‘n’ Roll Is Music Now (3:19)
Jimmy Cliff
Music Maker (2:59)
Richard Betts
Rain (3:48)
Jesse Winchester
Wake Me (2:18)
Elvin Bishop
Travelin’ Shoes (7:11)

Side 2
Doug Sahm Tex Mex Trip Groover’s Paradise (3:21)
Little Feat
Spanish Moon (3:01)
Maria Muldaur
Do I Care (3:02)
Adam Faith
I Believe In Love (3:32)
Ry Cooder
Tattler (4:11)
Lorraine Ellison
Walk Around Heaven (3:49)

Side 3
Wendy Waldman My Love Is All I Know (3:30)
Frankie Miller
Brickyard Blues (3:34)
America
Tin Man (3:23)
Arlo Guthrie
Me And My Moose (1:59)
Randy Newman
Rollin’ (2:51)
Van Dyke Parks
Come To The Sunshine (edit) (2:30)
Jesse Colin Young
Light Shine (5:19)

Side 4
Browning Bryant This Is My Day (4:00)
Ashton and Lord
We’re Gonna Make It (3:47)
Bonnie Raitt
What Is Success (3:23)
The Peter Peter Ivers Band
Alpha Centauri (3:10)
John Hartford
Boogie (1:36)
The Meters
Jungle Man (3:18)
Wet Willie
Keep On Smilin’ (3:55)
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LOSS LEADERS #18: Peaches (1974)

Peaches3Peaches 3back
Peaches (1974)
Dedicated Capricorn Records Sampler

The 1970 Loss Leader, Zapped (HERE), was comprised solely of artists signed to Frank Zappa’s Bizarre/Straight labels. 1974’s Peaches (and a later follow-up, Peaches Vol. 2) is similar, in that it’s a collection dedicated to WB subsidiary, Capricorn Records, which was then only 5 years old and growing rapidly since first signing The Allman Brothers in 1969. Along with many of the artists we often associate with the Southern Rock explosion of the 70s – The Marshall Tucker Band, Wet Willie, Grinderswitch and, of course, the (by now) fractured Allman Brothers (with solo projects from Duane & Gregg Allman and Dickie Betts) – are a number of names that reflected Capricorn’s growth outside the genre, like Elvin Bishop, Percy Sledge, Arthur Conley, Maxayn… and even country legend Kitty Wells, who’s backed by the likes of Betts, Chuck Leavell, Toy Caldwell and others. Johnny Jenkins, an original member of The Pinetoppers (with Otis Redding), is joined by a bunch of The Brothers (Duane, Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks, Jaimoe) on a 1970 recording – reissued in ’74 – and included here. That’s Scott Boyer and Tommy Talton, a.k.a. Cowboy, performing “Houston,” below. Quite noticeably, Dr. Demento took the day off from compiling and penning liners notes on this Loss Leader, as well as Vol. 2 (coming up). Peaches wasn’t routinely included in much of the Warner’s regular advertising for the series, via inner sleeves and brochures… however, in an August 1974 advert in Rolling Stone (HERE), this set sold for $2.50, 50¢ higher than any other Loss Leader (until a 1979 across-the-board price increase to $3 for double albums). You can still rustle up an original vinyl copy at Amazon, HERE, and find all of our Loss Leaders posts, HERE.

Side 1
Richard Betts Highway Call (4:27)
Wet Willie
Lucy Was In Trouble (3:41)
Elvin Bishop
Let It Flow (3:54)
Johnny Darrell
Orange Blossom Special (3:14)
Percy Sledge
Walkin’ In The Sun (3:25)
Maxayn
Moonfunk (4:40)

Side 2
The Marshall Tucker Band Blue Ridge Mountain Sky (3:37)
Boyer & Talton (Cowboy)
Houston (3:03)
Johnny Jenkins
Voodoo In You (4:52)
The Allman Brothers Band
Come And Go Blues (4:55)
Bobby Thompson
Foxfire (2:13)
Captain Beyond
Sufficiently Breathless (5:12)

Side 3
Gregg Allman Dreams (7:55)
Larry Henley
I’ll Come Running Back To You (3:14)
Grinderswitch
Catch A Train (4:46)
James Montgomery Band
I’m Funky But I’m Clean (4:12)
White Witch
Black Widow Lover (4:49)

Side 4
Hydra Glitter Queen (4:08)
Duke Williams And The Extremes
God Bless All The Girls In The World (2:54)
Kenny O’Dell
I Take It On Home (2:49)
Kitty Wells
I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (2:22)
Arthur Conley
Stop Knocking (2:54)
Chris Christman
Apron Strings (3:37)
Duane Allman
Happily Married Man (2:41)
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LOSS LEADERS #17: Hard Goods (1974)
Includes Neil Young’s “War Song” (w/ Graham Nash)

Hard GoodsHard Goods backHard Goods (1974)
Change Was In The Air…

The first Loss Leader of 1974 was issued during a year of turmoil and strife in America – which had manifested itself in a looming oil crisis, the climax of an unwinnable war and a shocking political upheaval. The inflationary times also brought changes to WB’s cost-conscious $2 2LP series. Gone were the six page inserts. Instead, the new format moving forward would print the commentary/liner notes on the inside of the gatefold sleeves. Barry Hansen (Dr. Demento) was still on board to annotate (thankfully), and so was the rewarding selection of new material available from Warners/Reprise and their associated labels; Bearsville, Brother (The Beach Boys’ label), Capricorn (soon to get their own dedicated promos), Casablanca, Chrysalis, DiscReet (Frank Zappa’s latest imprint), Palladium and Purple Records. Plus some rarities… or as Hansen referred to them, songs in the “collector’s item category,” including “War Song,” by Neil Young with Graham Nash (backed by The Stray Gators) – a 45 recorded to support the 1972 presidential bid of George McGovern. This rarity had been lost to time and had never resurfaced until Neil included it on 2009’s The Archives Vol. 1 1963–1972. Even rarer was the resurrected 1968 single from Denver, Boise And Johnson – a group that emerged from the ashes of The Chad Mitchell Trio – on their only released single, “The ’68 Nixon (This Year’s Model),” just in time to celebrate our soon-to-be-disgraced president, Richard Nixon. And, yes… that’s John Denver on this wicked parody of the then-candidate/punching bag, boasting some of the sharpest political satire ever committed to vinyl. As we’ve come to expect, there’s plenty of other cool music, too, including material from Terry Melcher (Byrds/Raiders producer), Alan Price, Steeleye Span (produced by Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson), Osibisa, and even Kiss. This was one I never heard back in the day, so hearing it now is a real treat. Check out the full page ad for Hard Goods that appeared in Rolling Stone, HERE. Find all the Loss Leaders, HERE.

Side 1
Graham Central Station We’ve Been Waiting (0:57)
Graham Central Station
Can You Handle It? (5:07)
Montrose
Good Rockin’ Tonight (2:55)
The Doobie Brothers
Pursuit On 53rd St. (2:30)
Ted Nugent And The Amboy Dukes
Sweet Revenge (3:59)
The Talbot Brothers
Trail Of Tears (3:48)
Foghat
That’ll Be The Day (2:36)

Side 2
Van Morrison Ain’t Nothin’ You Can Do (3:41)
Chunky, Novi & Ernie
Atlantic Liner (3:36)
Deep Purple
“A” 200 (4:05)
Frank Zappa
Cosmik Debris (4:21)
Todd Rundgren
Heavy Metal Kids (4:13)
Bob Seger
UMC (Upper Middle Class) (3:13)

Side 3
Kiss Strutter (3:08)
Steeleye Span
Thomas The Rhymer (3:07)
The Marshall Tucker Band
Another Cruel Love (3:53)
Osibisa
Take Your Trouble – Go (3:59)
Gregg Allman
Please Call Home (2:41)
Neil Young with Graham Nash
War Song (3:38)
Denver, Boise And Johnson
The ’68 Nixon (This Year’s Model) (1:31)

Side 4
Alan Price In Times Like These (2:35)
Seals & Crofts
Dance By The Light Of The Moon (4:39)
Terry Melcher
Dr. Horowitz (2:45)
Leo Sayer
The Show Must Go On (3:23)
The Beach Boys
Vegetables (2:05)
Robin Trower
About To Begin (3:43)
Dooley Wilson
As Time Goes By (3:08)
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LOSS LEADERS #16: All Singing – All Talking – All Rocking (1973)

All Singing-All Talking-All Rocking full
All Singing – All Talking – All Rocking (1973)
Includes Singing, Talking And Rocking…

Celebrating Warner Film division’s 50th anniversary, the title, All Singing – All Talking – All Rocking, paraphrases the company’s advertising slogan from the dawn of the “talkies” – which was then wowing audiences weaned on the silent movies of the early 1900s. The audio dialog excerpts that dot this set’s track list come from two, 3LP sets WB released to celebrate their history in the movies (50 Years Of Film and 50 Years Of Film Music), helping compiler Barry Hansen to spice up this otherwise non-themed Loss Leader in typical Dr. Demento-styled fashion. Interesting musical inclusions in this 1973 two-fer include: Three Man Army, featuring drummer Tony Newman (Jeff Beck Group), Adrian Gurvitz (Baker-Gurvitz Army) and brother Paul (B-GA & Gun); Back Door, with rocker-about-town Colin Hodgkinson (produced by Felix Pappalardi); the re-formed Sopwith Camel; obscure DiscReet recording artist, Kathy Dalton (DiscReet was Frank Zappa’s new label, who also returns with The Mothers’ “The Slime”); the mysteriously cultish M. Frog (recording under his given name, Labat); Ex-Byrds drummer Gene Parsons (getting his bluegrass on) and Bedlam, featuring Cozy Powell (Jeff Beck Group) & Dave Ball (Procol Harum). Not to mention a few of the label’s favored regulars, like Jethro Tull and Tim Buckley alongside the rising tide of new stylists, like The Allman Brothers and The Marshall Tucker Band. Here’s a print ad for from Rolling Stone. Vinyl copies are gettable at Amazon, HERE. Find all of our Loss Leaders, HERE.

Side 1
Dialogue Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton in Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? (0:58)
Chip Taylor
(I Want) The Real Thing (3:17)
Jimmy Cliff
On My Life (2:42)
Maria Muldaur
Don’t You Feel My Leg (Don’t You Make Me High) (2:44)
Strider
Higher And Higher (3:53)
Bonnie Raitt
Let Me In (3:35)
Dialogue
Humphrey Bogart and Alfonso Bedoya in The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre (0:16)
The Allman Brothers Band
Ramblin’ Man (5:00)

Side 2
JSD Band Cuckoo (3:53)
Three Man Army
Take A Look At The Light (3:53)
Jethro Tull
Inside (3:42)
Dialogue
James Dean in Rebel Without A Cause (0:14)
Back Door
Plantagenet (1:38)
The Mothers
I’m The Slime (3:29)
The Section
Bullet Train (3:51)

Side 3
Robin Trower Twice Removed From Yesterday (3:49)
The Marshall Tucker Band
Hillbilly Band (2:31)
Sopwith Camel
Dancin’ Wizard (2:59)
Kathy Dalton
Long Gone Charlie, Hit And Run (3:01)
Dialogue
Bugs Bunny (Mel Blanc) and Barbra Streisand in What’s Up Doc? (0:15)
Uriah Heep
Seven Stars (3:48)
America
Muskrat Love (3:03)
Martin Mull
Santa Doesn’t Cop Out On Dope (2:21)
Dialogue
James Cagney in Yankee Doodle Dandy (0:35)
Labat
Amphibian Chaff (0:59)

Side 4
Gene Parsons Monument (2:06)
The Doobie Brothers
Natural Thing (3:14)
Bedlam
Sweet Sister Mary (2:45)
Wendy Waldman
Gringo en Mexico (2:44)
Jesse Colin Young
Evenin’ (3:11)
Tim Buckley
Sally Go ‘Round The Roses (3:37)
Dialogue
Ingrid Bergman, Humphrey Bogart and Dooley Wilson in Casablanca (2:22)
Peter Yarrow
Wayfaring Stranger (3:16)
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LOSS LEADERS #15: Appetizers (1973)

AppetizersBackAppetizers
Appetizers (1973)
Dig In…

Appetizing highlights include Bert Jansch’s more representative version of Ewan MacColl’s “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face,” which was an old Scottish folk song before Roberta Flack’s award-winning re-interpretation. Bert’s co-vocalist, by the way, is none other than Mary Hopkin. Fanny’s “All Mine” is produced (kinda obviously) by Todd Rundgren, whose A Wizard, A True Star is also represented here. Deep Purple’s “I’m Alone,” was a non-LP single when it was first issued on Appetizers. Likewise, The Beach Boy’s “Susie Cincinnati” was a lowly B-side, left off of Sunflower. Here, it’s in mono. Lorraine Ellison cover’s Jimmy Cliff’s “Too Many Rivers To Cross,” as produced by Ted Templeman, and Flo & Eddie (a.k.a. The Phlorescent Leech & Eddie, a.k.a. Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan, a.k.a. former Mothers and Turtles)… all of their’s “Another Pop Star’s Life” is here. This Loss Leader is once again compiled by Dr. Demento (Barry Hansen), who also penned the multi-page liners and inserted some bizarre, old radio snippets between some of the selections. Another wonderful listen from another place and time. HERE is a print ad for Appetizers. You can get a copy at Amazon, HERE. To grab all of the Loss Leaders, go HERE.

Side 1
Little Feat Dixie Chicken (3:48)
Arlo Guthrie
Lovesick Blues (2:32)
Bert Jansch
The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face (2:58)
Linda Lewis
Rock-A-Doodle-Doo (3:21)
Paul Butterfield
Baby Please Don’t Go (3:20)
Seals & Crofts
Jessica (2:53)
Van Morrison
Love (3:24)

Side 2
Faces Borstal Boys (3:25)
Todd Rundgren
Is It My Name? (4:00)
Fanny
All Mine (3:46)
Alice Cooper
Billion Dollar Babies (3:36)
John Cale
Paris 1919 (3:59)
Procol Harum
Toujours L’Amour (3:31)

Side 3
Incredible String Band Second Fiddle (2:49)
Steeleye Span
Misty Moisty Morning (3:27)
The Doobie Brothers
Dark Eyed Cajun Woman (4:10)
Wet Willie
Airport (3:40)
T. Rex
Born To Boogie (2:03)
Deep Purple
I’m Alone (2:59)
Lorraine Ellison
Many Rivers To Cross (3:04)

Side 4
Martin Mull Licks Off Of Records (2:57)
William Truckaway And Magic
Roller Derby Starr (3:42)
Flo & Eddie
Another Pop Star’s Life (3:52)
Seatrain
Bloodshot Eyes (2:58)
The Beach Boys
Susie Cincinnati (2:53)
Foghat
What A Shame (4:04)
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LOSS LEADERS #14: The Days Of Wine And Vinyl (1972)

The Days Of Wine And Vinyl 2backDays Of Wine And Vinyl
The Days Of Wine And Vinyl (1972)
Both Folky And Funky…

The first disc of The Days Of Wine And Vinyl has a decidedly folky and funky feel, dominated by a number of acoustic artists groovin’ a little bit harder than their reps might suggest. Tim Buckley is rockin’ with some soulful background singers (and is heard wailing, “Ohh, I love me a black woman”), while even Captain Beefheart’s contribution, “Too Much Time,” is of the soulful, horn-driven variety, with background vocals by The Blackberries – unlike anything in his recorded catalog. Hell, the good Captain actually stylistically fits into his surroundings, for a change. Arlo Guthrie is practically unrecognizable on his original composition, the 45-only track, “The Ballad Of Tricky Fred” – with a sound so atypical it was never issued on any of his albums (I don’t think). Arthur Conley is always a groove, so his “Rita” is no surprise, except that it too was a non-LP cut at the time. The Section is a short-lived, all-instrumental group featuring session masters Danny Kortchmar, Russ Kunkel and Leland Sklar, while “Blind John,” from The Dead’s drummer, Mickey Hart, features the Tower Of Power horns and Grace Slick, among others. Variety is the watchword for side two, with Harpers Bizarre covering Harry Nilsson’s “Poly High” (their spelling), and contributions from Sparks, Roxy Music, Jethro Tull, the great Bobby Charles, Memphis Slim, and even a resurrected 1966 single from David Bowie, making for a curious addition to this 2LP set… and the series. Get a vinyl copy of The Days Of Wine And Vinyl at Amazon, HERE. Find all the Loss Leaders, HERE.

Side 1
Tir Na Nog Come And See The Show (3:33)
Arlo Guthrie
The Ballad Of Tricky Fred (2:38)
Tim Buckley
Move With Me (4:48)
Jesse Winchester
Isn’t That So? (2:23)
Arthur Conley
Rita (2:39)
Captain Beefheart And The Magic Band
Too Much Time (2:44)
The Section
Doin’ The Meatball (2:52)

Side 2
James Taylor Don’t Let Me Be Lonely Tonight (2:33)
America
Head And Heart (3:47)
Mickey Hart
Blind John (3:42)
Dion
Sea Gull (3:58)
The Incredible String Band
My Father Was A Lighthouse Keeper (4:17)
Bonnie Raitt
Too Long At The Fair (2:59)

Side 3
Alexis Korner and Snape Country Shoes (4:06)
Steeleye Span
Spotted Cow (3:03)
Jethro Tull
Living In The Past (3:18)
Dick Heckstall-Smith
Future Song (3:58)
Harpers Bizarre
Poly High (2:47)
Sparks
Moon Over Kentucky (4:11)

Side 4
The Youngbloods Speedo (3:30)
Bobby Charles
Small Town Talk (3:24)
Memphis Slim
You’re The One (3:22)
David Bowie
Can’t Help Thinking About Me (2:41)
Roxy Music
Virginia Plain (2:56)
Norman Greenbaum
The Day The Well Went Dry (2:33)
John Hartford
Bye-Bye (3:23)
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LOSS LEADERS #13: Burbank (1972)

BurbankBurbank (1972)
Burbank I

The series returns to more of the groundbreaking music it’s best known for with Burbank, sporting a cover that parodies the band Chicago’s well-known logo and artwork. An extremely cool variety of artists, from Curved Air to John Cale to Alice Cooper, as both LPs stylistically ping-pong across the spectrum. Lots of funky stuff, from Tower Of Power, Labelle, The Meters and Maxayn. Plenty of rock from Jimi Hendrix (what the liner notes call “Hendrix’s grandest experiment in pure psychedelia”), Foghat (produced by Dave Edmunds), Captain Beyond (w/ members of Deep Purple, Iron Butterfly & Johnny Winter’s band). Strange bedfellows, in the form of Beaver & Krause, John Fahey And His Orchestra Of Rivers And Religion, Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan (Flo & Eddie from The Turtles and The Mothers) and Martin Mull. The Fanny track features horn men Jim Price and Bobby Keys, with production “under the hitful eye of” Richard Perry. Deep Purple and Arlo Guthrie each have non-LP tracks that were (previously) only available as singles. The strange selections by John Cale (“Days Of Steam”) and Van Dyke Parks (“G-Man Hoover”) have compiler Dr. Demento’s fingerprints all over the choice selection, picked for their optimum uniqueness over their promotional record-selling abilities. The multi-page inserts are a great read (below). See a print ad, HERE. Find it at Amazon, HERE. Find all the Leaders, HERE.

Side 1: Burbank, USA
Tower Of Power Down To The Nightclub (2:47)
Curved Air
Phantasmagoria (3:14)
Alice Cooper
Public Animal #9 (3:47)
Van Dyke Parks
G-Man Hoover (2:52)
Arlo Guthrie
Voter Registration Rag (0:57)
John Cale
Intro/Days Of Steam (2:55)
Labelle
Peace With Yourself (2:57)

Side 2: Downtown Strutters
Fanny Borrowed Time (3:35)
T. Rex
Telegram Sam (3:42)
Maxayn
Trying For Days (3:31)
Foghat
Highway (Killing Me) (3:44)
The Meters
Cabbage Alley (3:22)
Jimi Hendrix
The Stars That Play With Laughing Sam’s Dice (4:12)

Side 3: West Side Stories
Mark Volman And Howard Kaylan I’ve Been Born Again (3:51)
Beaver & Krause
Bluebird Canyon Stomp (3:16)
Captain Beyond
Thousand Days Of Yesterdays (3:53)
Bob Weir
Cassidy (3:39)
John Fahey
Steamboat Gwine ‘Round De Bend (4:11)
Zephyr
Sunset Ride (3:49)

Side 4: Both Sides Of The Tracks
John Baldry You Can’t Judge A Book By The Cover (4:12)
Deep Purple
When A Blind Man Cries (3:29)
Martin Mull
Ventriloquist Love (2:55)
John Renbourn
Kokomo Blues (3:50)
Matthew Ellis
Avalon (4:48)
Geoff & Maria Muldaur
Kneein’ Me (3:24)
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LOSS LEADERS #12: Middle Of The Road (1972)

Middle Of The Road fullMiddle Of The Road (1972)
Truth in advertising…

I’m not sure if most of this Loss Leader can really be considered “MOR” (in the Frank Sinatra sense of the word… and yeah, he’s here), but Middle Of The Road does display a demographically softer side to the series, with plenty of acoustic offerings and quieter tunes. Which means… no Capt. Beefheart, no GTO’s and no Fugs. Instead you get selections from the likes of Jesse Colin Young, James Taylor, Dion, John Sebastian, Rod McKuen and Gordon Lightfoot. And that’s just the first disc. Once again, Dr. Demento compiles this collection (and annotates), but he keeps his noted wackiness in check, since this collection is, by nature, designed for the reflective nature within us all. Of course, for those of us who don’t buy a lot of these kinds of albums, this set does provides a valuable service – since you may not own much of this material already. The good Doctor’s interesting liner notes tell us; the opening track by Jennifer, “In The Morning,” was written by Barry Gibb and produced by The Velvet Underground’s John Cale, and… Dionne Warwick used to spell her name Warwicke. Go figure. The format does loosen up a little, with contributions from Randy Newman, Fleetwood Mac and T. Rex, but even those are on the softer side, as are tracks from The Beach Boys (“Caroline No”) and Todd Rundgren (“Dust In The Wind”). Vinyl copies of Middle Of The Road are at Amazon, HERE. For all of the Loss Leaders, go HERE.

Side 1: Friendly Freeways
Jennifer In The Morning (3:00)
Dion
Sunshine Lady (2:26)
Rod McKuen
Friendly Sounds (2:40)
Jesse Colin Young
It’s A Lovely Day (2:26)
Gordon Lightfoot
Second Cup Of Coffee (3:04)
James Taylor
Hey Mister, That’s Me Up On The Jukebox (3:49)

Side 2: Sensuous Skyways
Randy Newman Political Science (2:03)
Gordon Lightfoot
Ode To Big Blue (4:48)
John Stewart
An Account Of Haley’s Comet (3:52)
Kenny Rogers and The First Edition
Calico Silver (5:15)
John Sebastian
Give Us A Break (3:40)
Fleetwood Mac
World In Harmony (3:28)

Side 3: Pensive Pathways
Frank Sinatra Love’s Been Good To Me (3:25)
Seals & Crofts
Paper Airplanes (2:52)
Todd Rundgren
Dust In The Wind (3:48)
The Beach Boys
Caroline No (2:19)
America
I Need You (3:07)
Mary Travers
It Will Come To You Again (3:38)
T. Rex
Life’s A Gas (2:25)

Side 4: Homeward Highways
Alex Taylor Comin’ Back To You (4:13)
Pentangle
When I Get Home (4:59)
Peter Yarrow
Side Road (2:55)
Tony Joe White
The Family (3:29)
Dionne Warwicke
If You Never Say Goodbye (3:14)
Paul Stookey
Wedding Song (There Is Love) (3:44)
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